Marta L. Wayne

Professor & Department Chair

Ph.D. Princeton University, 1994

427 Bartram Hall
(352) 392-9925

mlwayne@ufl.edu
Personal Website – coming soon
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Research Interests

I study the maintenance of genetic variation, because without it, populations can not evolve. There are two ubiquitous and contradictory observations about traits in natural populations: there is genetic variation for almost every trait ever tested, and most traits are under natural selection. These observations are contradictory, because we expect natural selection to erode genetic variation. Why then does variation persist? I primarily use the model organism Drosophila melanogaster. I’m interested in host-parasite coevolution, the evolution of virulence, virus evolution, sexual conflict, and dosage compensation.

Representative Publications

M. L. Wayne and B. M. Bolker 2015. Infectious Disease: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.

H. Piontkivska, L. F. Matos, S. Paul, B. Scharfenberg, W. G. Farmerie, M. M. Miyamoto, and M. L. Wayne 2016. Role of host-driven mutagenesis in determining genome evolution of sigma virus (DMelSV; Rhabdoviridae) in Drosophila melanogaster. Genome Biology & Evolution, 8 (9): 2952-2963.

J. Brusini, Y. Wang, L. F. Matos, L.-S. Sylvestre, B. M. Bolker, and M. L. Wayne 2014. Virulence evolution in a host-parasite system in the absence of viral evolution. Evolutionary Ecology Research, 15(8): 883-901.

R. M. Graze, L. M. McIntyre, A. M. Morse, B. M. Boyd, S. V. Nuzhdin, and M. L. Wayne 2014. What the X has to do with it: differences in regulatory variability between the sexes in Drosophila simulans. Genome Biology and Evolution, 6: 818-829.

D. W. Hall and M. L. Wayne 2013. Ohno’s “peril of hemizygosity” revisited: gene loss, dosage compensation, and mutation. Genome Biology & Evolution, 5:1-15.

C. C. Rittschoff, S. Pattanaik, L. Johnson, L. F. Matos, J. Brusini, and M. L. Wayne 2013. Sigma virus and male reproductive success in Drosophila melanogaster. Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology, 67(4): 529-540.

M. L. Wayne, G. M. Blohm, M. E. Brooks, K. L. Regan, B. Y. Brown, M. Barfield, R. D. Holt, and B. M. Bolker 2011. The prevalence and persistence of sigma virus, a biparentally transmitted parasite of Drosophila melanogaster. Evolutionary Ecology Research, 13: 323-345.

M. L. Wayne, J. Pienaar, M. Telonis-Scott, L. S. Sylvestre, S. V. Nuzhdin, and L. M. McIntyre 2010. Expression of defense genes in Drosophila evolves under a different selective regime from expression of other genes. Evolution 65(4): 1068–1078.

Current Graduate Students

Name
Email
Research Interests
Meghan Bentz mbentz314@ufl.edu Host-Parasite interactions, behavioral and evolutionary ecology
Luciano Soares lsoares@ufl.edu Hybridization in sea turtle populations
Kathryn Totten kt2003@ufl.edu Parasite host co-evolution

Current Postdoc

Name
Email
Research Interests
Galaxia Cortés‑Hinojosa, DVM, M.Sc., PhD. galy2010@ufl.edu Virus discovery & evolution, host-parasite co-evolution, wildlife diseases, conservation medicine, and One Health